Mule by Kat Woods

Dark, affecting, yet surprisingly warm, Irish group Omnibus’ ‘Mule’ is a significant accomplishment

Dark, affecting, yet surprisingly warm, Irish group Omnibus’ ‘Mule’ is a significant accomplishment. Based on the true story of the ‘Peru Two’ who, on drugs smuggling charges (which they are absolutely guilty of) are incarcerated in a grim, murky South American prison, issues surrounding morality, feminism, and the media are expertly looked at.

It was absorbing: we, as an audience, were the jury staring darkly into the wretched lives of two young women who both seemed familiar – I, for one, realised that given the right (or, rather, the wrong) circumstances, the situation the women find themselves in could happen to a neighbour, a loved one, or even myself.

extremely vivid and occasionally disturbing imagery.

Though the set and costume were simple, with the girls wearing all black and a projector occasionally adding to the show with segments about the media, the use of language created extremely vivid and occasionally disturbing imagery.

Whether it be a description of a bloody encounter with a pregnant woman who has swallowed a load of drugs (and the subsequent priest that comes to visit, performing the last rites…) or of beautiful Ireland and its traditional dancing, the show plays out like a film in the mind.

the show plays out like a film in the mind.

This is all but aided by stellar acting from both women Edith Poor and Aoife Lennon whose slick multi-roleing is some of the best I’ve ever seen. They play the part of a terrified young Irish girl, a perverted prison guard, a charming and slimy drug dealer, a salacious news reporter and a mourning sister at the end of a phone to absolute perfection, and were astounding and terrifying to watch.

the blatant abuse of vulnerable women

Ultimately, the feminist themes of the play rang true with me the most, with the blatant abuse of vulnerable women within the drug trafficking world becoming sadly all too clear as the play progressed. If you’d like to see a show that gets under the skin of the media, maintains a feeling of sustained fear, and, ultimately, moves the audience, Mule is essential viewing.

https://tickets.edfringe.com/whats-on/mule

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Lucy Davidson

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