Electrolyte

Absorbing, enthusiastic, and genuinely surprising, ‘Electrolyte’ is a dynamic production that invites us all to hold hands and dance through the worst of life to the best of jams.

In the first half of this show – which is part live gig, part spoken word poetry slam – I believed that I was in for a typical coming-of-age drama. Friends were celebrating one minute and falling apart the next. An amazing guitar girl steals the heart of an idealistic, but troubled, young adult who is looking for a way out of her small world. Family tensions are alluded to, and drugs and booze are flowing.

This is not a criticism at all: I love a good angsty coming-of-age tale, especially one mixed with electric guitars and beautiful vocals, and how timelessly entertaining they are. It’s loud and defiant and as lovable as your old Docs with the MCR lyrics Sharpie’d to the rubber sole.

However, ‘Electrolyte’ suddenly becomes its own kind of explosive beast, spiralling into an unexpected darkness. And it’s genius.

Wildcard Theatre has produced a brilliant, heartbreaking story about what happens when we get too strained and too wild despite ourselves, and slowly pieces us, raw and mascara-streaked, back together with affection. The performances are superb, the dynamic enthusiasm and sparkling relationships between the cast are truly infectious, and the music itself is undeniably amazing. The integration of audience interaction, gig theatre, and masterful storytelling makes for a wonderfully unique and exciting piece of art. If you don’t want to go home and call your best friend and get that kind of happy-cry-drunk with them, you obviously saw the wrong show.

Cathartic and clever, ‘Electrolyte’ is an adrenaline fuelled celebration of our ability to keep going and keep creating. Outstanding.

 

Electrolyte runs until the 26th of August – buy tickets here.

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Zoe Robertson

Literature student at The University of Edinburgh - interested in new writing and voices.

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