Doubting Thomas

Doubting Thomas is a piece of extraordinary theatre that will stay with me for the rest of my life.

Monologues that break the fourth wall pull at your heart whilst dialogues between the actors break it all over again as we learn about heinous crime, punishment and redemption with warmth, humour and love.

heinous crime, punishment and redemption with warmth, humour and love.

The story follows Thom, a violent criminal living in Glasgow, at a stage in his life where he is able to recognise his mistakes and help others. The show comprises of short scenes with 6 other characters – 5 men and 1 woman, who he fights with, rejects, attempts to help, pleads with, tries to have sex with and laughs at.

We as an audience and cast together frame the stage: the audience looking down and the cast looking on, which creates a strange but powerful sense of community that is extraordinarily endearing.

a strange but powerful sense of community that is extraordinarily endearing.

As each character plays his or her part, they leave, walking out through the audience: leaving Thom nearly on his own, stripped bare and vulnerable. Like most of the play, it’s so subtle yet so powerful.

In fact, I’m reluctant to call it a story, or a show: it felt like so much more than a constructed piece of drama written to entertain, and it was only afterwards that I realised why this was. Doubting Thomas is in fact a true story, with the brilliant Thomas McCrudden himself taking the lead as the tortured, violent, macho main who tragically and frankly talks about his past.

Doubting Thomas is in fact a true story, with the brilliant Thomas McCrudden himself taking the lead as the tortured, violent, macho main who tragically and frankly talks about his past.

He looks so unassuming but has a past of intense darkness underneath: in fact, he does admit that he was addicted to violence at one time, and you find yourself looking at his hands and his eyes and wondering what they have done and seen.

Moments of light humour punctuate through the heavy material, with traditional Scottish language and wit turning the play into something that is unashamedly ‘itself’, in that it never shies away from intensity or softens any kind of blow. Startlingly moving, violent and liberating, Doubting Thomas is one of the best pieces of theatre I have ever seen, and I feel privileged to have watched it.

Doubting Thomas is one of the best pieces of theatre I have ever seen, and I feel privileged to have watched it.

https://tickets.edfringe.com/whats-on/doubting-thomas

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Lucy Davidson

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